msq {psych}R Documentation

75 mood items from the Motivational State Questionnaire for 3896 participants

Description

Emotions may be described either as discrete emotions or in dimensional terms. The Motivational State Questionnaire (MSQ) was developed to study emotions in laboratory and field settings. The data can be well described in terms of a two dimensional solution of energy vs tiredness and tension versus calmness. Additional items include what time of day the data were collected and a few personality questionnaire scores.

Usage

data(msq)

Format

A data frame with 3896 observations on the following 92 variables.

active

a numeric vector

afraid

a numeric vector

alert

a numeric vector

angry

a numeric vector

anxious

a numeric vector

aroused

a numeric vector

ashamed

a numeric vector

astonished

a numeric vector

at.ease

a numeric vector

at.rest

a numeric vector

attentive

a numeric vector

blue

a numeric vector

bored

a numeric vector

calm

a numeric vector

cheerful

a numeric vector

clutched.up

a numeric vector

confident

a numeric vector

content

a numeric vector

delighted

a numeric vector

depressed

a numeric vector

determined

a numeric vector

distressed

a numeric vector

drowsy

a numeric vector

dull

a numeric vector

elated

a numeric vector

energetic

a numeric vector

enthusiastic

a numeric vector

excited

a numeric vector

fearful

a numeric vector

frustrated

a numeric vector

full.of.pep

a numeric vector

gloomy

a numeric vector

grouchy

a numeric vector

guilty

a numeric vector

happy

a numeric vector

hostile

a numeric vector

idle

a numeric vector

inactive

a numeric vector

inspired

a numeric vector

intense

a numeric vector

interested

a numeric vector

irritable

a numeric vector

jittery

a numeric vector

lively

a numeric vector

lonely

a numeric vector

nervous

a numeric vector

placid

a numeric vector

pleased

a numeric vector

proud

a numeric vector

quiescent

a numeric vector

quiet

a numeric vector

relaxed

a numeric vector

sad

a numeric vector

satisfied

a numeric vector

scared

a numeric vector

serene

a numeric vector

sleepy

a numeric vector

sluggish

a numeric vector

sociable

a numeric vector

sorry

a numeric vector

still

a numeric vector

strong

a numeric vector

surprised

a numeric vector

tense

a numeric vector

tired

a numeric vector

tranquil

a numeric vector

unhappy

a numeric vector

upset

a numeric vector

vigorous

a numeric vector

wakeful

a numeric vector

warmhearted

a numeric vector

wide.awake

a numeric vector

alone

a numeric vector

kindly

a numeric vector

scornful

a numeric vector

EA

Thayer's Energetic Arousal Scale

TA

Thayer's Tense Arousal Scale

PA

Positive Affect scale

NegAff

Negative Affect scale

Extraversion

Extraversion from the Eysenck Personality Inventory

Neuroticism

Neuroticism from the Eysenck Personality Inventory

Lie

Lie from the EPI

Sociability

The sociability subset of the Extraversion Scale

Impulsivity

The impulsivity subset of the Extraversions Scale

MSQ_Time

Time of day the data were collected

MSQ_Round

Rounded time of day

TOD

a numeric vector

TOD24

a numeric vector

ID

subject ID

condition

What was the experimental condition after the msq was given

scale

a factor with levels msq r original or revised msq

exper

Which study were the data collected: a factor with levels AGES BING BORN CART CITY COPE EMIT FAST Fern FILM FLAT Gray imps item knob MAPS mite pat-1 pat-2 PATS post RAFT Rim.1 Rim.2 rob-1 rob-2 ROG1 ROG2 SALT sam-1 sam-2 SAVE/PATS sett swam swam-2 TIME VALE-1 VALE-2 VIEW

Details

The Motivational States Questionnaire (MSQ) is composed of 72 items, which represent the full affective range (Revelle & Anderson, 1998). The MSQ consists of 20 items taken from the Activation-Deactivation Adjective Check List (Thayer, 1986), 18 from the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS, Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988) along with the items used by Larsen and Diener (1992). The response format was a four-point scale that corresponds to Russell and Carroll's (1999) "ambiguous–likely-unipolar format" and that asks the respondents to indicate their current standing (“at this moment") with the following rating scale:
0—————-1—————-2—————-3
Not at all A little Moderately Very much

The original version of the MSQ included 70 items. Intermediate analyses (done with 1840 subjects) demonstrated a concentration of items in some sections of the two dimensional space, and a paucity of items in others. To begin correcting this, 3 items from redundantly measured sections (alone, kindly, scornful) were removed, and 5 new ones (anxious, cheerful, idle, inactive, and tranquil) were added. Thus, the correlation matrix is missing the correlations between items 4, 41, and 54 and 71-75.

Procedure. The data were collected over nine years, as part of a series of studies examining the effects of personality and situational factors on motivational state and subsequent cognitive performance. In each of 38 studies, prior to any manipulation of motivational state, participants signed a consent form and filled out the MSQ. (The procedures of the individual studies are irrelevant to this data set and could not affect the responses to the MSQ, since this instrument was completed before any further instructions or tasks).

The EA and TA scales are from Thayer, the PA and NA scales are from Watson et al. (1988). Scales and items:

Energetic Arousal: Active, Energetic, Vigorous, Wakeful, Wideawake, Full of Pep, Lively, -sleepy, -tired, - drowsy (ADACL)

Tense Arousal: Intense, Jittery, fearful, tense, clutched up, -quiet, -still, - placid, - calm, -at rest (ADACL)

Positive Affect: active, excited, strong, inspired, determined, attentive, interested, enthusiastic, proud, alert (PANAS)

Negative Affect: jittery, nervous, scared, afraid, guilty, ashamed, distressed, upset, hostile, irritable (PANAS)

The next set of circumplex scales were taken (I think) from Larsen and Diener (1992). High activation: active, aroused, surprised, intense, astonished Activated PA: elated, excited, enthusiastic, lively Unactivated NA : calm, serene, relaxed, at rest, content, at ease PA: happy, warmhearted, pleased, cheerful, delighted Low Activation: quiet, inactive, idle, still, tranquil Unactivated PA: dull, bored, sluggish, tired, drowsy NA: sad, blue, unhappy, gloomy, grouchy Activated NA: jittery, anxious, nervous, fearful, distressed.

Keys for these separate scales are shown in the examples.

In addition to the MSQ, there are 5 scales from the Eysenck Personality Inventory (Extraversion, Impulsivity, Sociability, Neuroticism, Lie). The Imp and Soc are subsets of the the total extraversion scale.

Source

Data collected at the Personality, Motivation, and Cognition Laboratory, Northwestern University.

References

Rafaeli, Eshkol and Revelle, William (2006), A premature consensus: Are happiness and sadness truly opposite affects? Motivation and Emotion, 30, 1, 1-12.

Revelle, W. and Anderson, K.J. (1998) Personality, motivation and cognitive performance: Final report to the Army Research Institute on contract MDA 903-93-K-0008. (http://www.personality-project.org/revelle/publications/ra.ari.98.pdf).

Thayer, R.E. (1989) The biopsychology of mood and arousal. Oxford University Press. New York, NY.

Watson,D., Clark, L.A. and Tellegen, A. (1988) Development and validation of brief measures of positive and negative affect: The PANAS scales. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54(6):1063-1070.

See Also

affect for an example of the use of some of these adjectives in a mood manipulation study.

make.keys and score.items for instructions on how to score multiple scales, and fa and fa.extension for instructions on how to do factor analyses or factor extension.

Examples

data(msq)
if(FALSE){ #not run in the interests of time
#basic descriptive statistics
describe(msq)
}
#score them for 12 short scales
 
keys <- make.keys(colnames(msq)[1:75], list(
 EA = c("active", "energetic", "vigorous", "wakeful", "wide.awake", "full.of.pep",
       "lively", "-sleepy", "-tired", "-drowsy"),
  TA =c("intense", "jittery", "fearful", "tense", "clutched.up", "-quiet", "-still", 
       "-placid", "-calm", "-at.rest") ,
  PA =c("active", "excited", "strong", "inspired", "determined", "attentive", 
          "interested", "enthusiastic", "proud", "alert"),
 NAf =c("jittery", "nervous", "scared", "afraid", "guilty", "ashamed", "distressed",  
         "upset", "hostile", "irritable" ),
 HAct = c("active", "aroused", "surprised", "intense", "astonished"),
 aPA = c("elated", "excited", "enthusiastic", "lively"),
 uNA = c("calm", "serene", "relaxed", "at.rest", "content", "at.ease"),
 pa = c("happy", "warmhearted", "pleased", "cheerful", "delighted" ),
 LAct = c("quiet", "inactive", "idle", "still", "tranquil"),
  uPA =c( "dull", "bored", "sluggish", "tired", "drowsy"),
 naf = c( "sad", "blue", "unhappy", "gloomy", "grouchy"),
 aNA = c("jittery", "anxious", "nervous", "fearful", "distressed"))
       )
       
msq.scores <- scoreItems(keys,msq[1:75])

#show a circumplex structure 
fcirc <- fa(msq.scores$scores[,5:12],2)  
fa.plot(fcirc,labels=colnames(msq.scores$scores)[5:12])
if(FALSE) {
#extend this solution to EA/TA  NA/PA space
fe  <- fa.extension(cor(msq.scores$scores[,5:12],msq.scores$scores[,1:4]),fcirc)
fa.diagram(fcirc,fe=fe,main="Extending the circumplex structure to  EA/TA and PA/NA ")

#show the 2 dimensional structure
f2 <- fa(msq[1:70],2)
fa.plot(f2,labels=colnames(msq)[1:70],title="2 dimensions of affect")

#sort them by polar coordinates
round(polar(f2),2)
}
            


[Package psych version 1.4.5 Index]
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